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Researchers

 

 

Department of Mathematics

Mathematical Analysis Group

Prof.

Yukitaka Abe

Dr. Abe is interested in meromorphic functions in several variables, the study of complex Lie groups from the viewpoint of complex analysis, and universal functions in several variables.

Prof.

Masato Kikuchi

Dr. Kikuchi's current research involves the analysis of Banach function spaces by means of the martingale theory. He succeeded in characterizing those Banach function spaces in which some martingale inequalities hold. Furthermore, he has established various new types of martingale inequalities in Banach function spaces.

Prof.

Takashi Koda

Dr. Koda's research is mainly concerned with the geometry of almost complex manifolds, especially the twistor spaces of almost Hermitian 4-manifolds, Dirac operators, Riemannian 3-symmetric spaces, and so on.

Prof.

Setsuo Nagai

Using precalculus to study what curvatures can fit into what spaces, and submanifold theories.

Prof.

Keiko Fujita

Theory of analytic functionals, Integral representation for analytic functions and its applications.

Assoc. Prof.

Tatsuya Kawabe

Discontinuous action of groups on manifolds, and geometrical properties of their orbit spaces as spaceform.

Assoc. Prof.

Iwao Kimura

Dr. Kimura's primary research involves the distribution of arithmetic objects. He is interested in the (in)divisibility of special values of zeta functions associated with quadratic fields. These values are intimately connected with the orders of algebraic K-groups and certain cohomology groups. His methods involve the theory of prehomogeneous vector spaces, the congruence of modular forms and some techniques of analytic number theories. He is also interested in explicit computations of number theories.

Mathematical Science of Information Group

Prof.

Hideo Ikeda

Dr. Ikeda is concerned with the dynamics of pattern formation. In particular, he is focusing on the use of singular perturbation methods in the study of nonlinear wave motion. He has developed techniques for studying the existence and the stability of traveling and standing waves with applications in nerve impulse and chemical reaction.

Prof.

Yasuhiro Fujita

Dr. Fujita's research interests include logarithmic Sobolev inequality and its relation to stochastic control theory and parial differential equations.

Prof.

Hiroyuki Yamane

Study of Lie superalgebras and quantum groups with developing a theory of Coxeter semigroups.

Assoc. Prof.

Keiichi Ueda

Mathematical and numerical analysis of self-organized patterns in dissipative systems.

Assoc. Prof.

Hideo Deguchi

Researching partial differential equations using Colombeau's theory of generalized functions.

Asst. Prof.

Naoto Kouyama

Researching code and lattice theory by using computer and automorphic form theory.

Visiting Professors

Visiting Prof.

Kusuo Kobayashi

Dr. Kobayashi's research interests center on two areas. The first involves the study of various aspects of stochastic processes, especially branching processes. The other focuses on his research pertaining to the area of diffusion equations associated with stochastic processes.

Visiting Prof.

Takashi Sugatani

Dr. Sugatani's research centers on the theory of ring extensions, seminormality, u-closedness, t-closedness, quasinormality, accuracy and superprimitivity.

Visiting Prof.

Masamichi Hamana

Operator algebra theory (theory of rings generated by operators in a Hilbert space).

Visiting Prof.

Norio Yoshida

Dr. Yoshida studies the existence of zeros for solutions of partial differential equations or partial functional differential equations. He is currently establishing Picone identity or Picone-type inequalities for quasilinear elliptic equations to obtain oscillation theorems. Additionally, he is developing oscillation theories for partial differential equations with functional arguments.

Department of Physics

Condensed Matter Physics Group

Prof.

Hiroyuki Ikemoto

Dr. Ikemoto studies the properties and structure of structurally disordered matter. He has researched metal-nonmetal transition of the liquid chalcogenide using optical and EXAFS measurements at high temperatures and high pressures. He is currently studying the structure and physical properties of nanoparticles.

Prof.

Tomohiko Kuwai

Rare-earth or uranium intermetallic compounds categorized as SCES display a variety of anomalies based on magnetic quantum fluctuations on the unstable Fermi surface developed at low temperatures. Dr. Kuwai uses experiments to investigate the magnetic properties in these compounds, mainly with specific heat and thermoelectric power measurements below 300K down to 0.1K under a strong magnetic field or high pressure.

Assoc. Prof.

Takashi Tayama

Dr. Tayama is interested in thermodynamic studies of strongly correlated electron systems, and superconductivity, magnetism, and multipole ordering phenomena in f-electron materials.

Assoc. Prof.

Keisuke Hatada

The main stream of the research of Dr. Hatada is based on theoretical development of core electron spectroscopies of synchrotron radiation. He develops his own code “FPMS”. By using this code he studies local structures of materials which do not posses long range order, such as nano particles. He also studies X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to study femto second order dynamics of materials under strongly out of equilibrium.

Asst. Prof.

Yuuji Matumoto

Dr. Matsumoto studies the physical properties (resistivity, heat capacity, Seebeck effect, magnetic properties, de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect) of the strongly correlated f-electron systems at low temperature.

Quantum Physics Group

Prof.

Takashi Kurimoto

Dr. Kurimoto's research is based on theoretical elementary particle physics. In particular, he is interested in the transition of elementary particles into one another, or so-called "flavor physics." During these processes, asymmetry between particle and anti-particle (CP violation) may emerge. Studying this kind of asymmetry could lead us to an explanation on the origin of our universe.

Prof.

Kaori Kobayashi

Dr. Kobayashi is interested in high resolution spectroscopy. Microwave spectroscopy is used in order to study interstellar molecules with internal rotors. The observed data provides precise rest frequencies and is stored in the free online database for open use. Additionally, near-infrared spectroscopy is employed to observe radio-active tritiated water.

Prof.

Yoshiki Moriwaki

Dr. Moriwaki's research interest is in the spectroscopic study of atomic, ionic and molecular impurities in liquid and solid helium. These impurities are anticipated to be micro-probes of physical properties of liquid helium, such as super-fluidity, roton, maxon, etc. He is also interested in the collision dynamics of atoms at a cryogenic temperature.

Assoc. Prof.

Katsunori Enomoto

Dr. Enomoto has investigated emission spectra of alkali-helium exciplexes formed in cryogenic helium gases. He has also investigated photoassociation spectra of laser-cooled Yb atoms. He is now interested in decelerating/trapping polar molecules and molecular spectroscopy.

Assoc. Prof.

Mitsuru Kakizaki

Dr. Kakizaki's research interest lies in phenomenological study of models beyond the Standard Model of particle physics.

Assoc. Prof.

Kazuhiro Yamamoto

Dr. Kazuhiro Yamamoto proceeds with development of KAGRA, interferometric gravitational wave detector at Kamioka mine, Hida city, Gifu prefecture in order to investigate black holes, neutron stars, supernovae and so on.

Visiting Professors

Visiting Prof.

Yosikazu Isikawa

Dr. Isikawa's research areas are: 1) single-crystal growth of strongly correlated electron systems, including rare earth elements, 2) valence fluctuating systems, Kondo systems, heavy-fermion systems and superconductivity, 3) the transition between magnetic and non-magnetic states in the vicinity of the critical quantum point, 4) fluctuation of quadrupole moments, especially for praseodymium-based compounds and 5) development of thermoelectric devices with large thermoelectric power at low temperatures.

Department of Chemistry

Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Group

Prof.

Koichi Nozaki

Dr. Nozaki's research focuses on photophysical and photochemical processes of molecules containing transition-metal ions, such as photoluminescence and photoinduced-electron transfer in transition-metal compounds. He is studying the dynamics and mechanism for these primary processes by means of spectroscopic measurements and quantum chemical calculations.

Prof.

Kiyoshi Tsuge

Dr. Tsuge studies synthesis, structures, and properties of coordination compounds. The major interest is focused on their luminescence properties, redox activities, and responses to external stimuli.

Assoc. Prof.

Tsutomu Osawa

Dr. Osawa's interests include physical and organic chemistry of heterogeneous catalysts and catalysis, with current emphasis on an enantioselective solid catalyst. He is also studying the development of these catalysts for reforming methane using carbon dioxide, and for the oxidation of light alkanes.

Assoc. Prof.

Honoh Suzuki

Dr. Suzuki researches laser-induced dynamics of nanostructures in solutions. He is developing time-resolved spectroscopic and microscopic methods to study the far-from-equilibrium behavior of molecular associates (micelles and liposomes) and nanostructures (nanoparticles, nanotubes and nanoshells), which may be useful in laser-assisted biomedical applications.

Assoc. Prof.

Hideki Ohtsu

Creation of Functional Coordination Compounds Inspired by Renewable Energy Conversion in Nature.

Lect.

Munetaka Iwamura

Dr. Iwamura's research is based on the photochemistry of metal complexes that play important roles in solar-cell photosensitizers and photo-induced electron transfer reactions. He is studying the dynamics of photo-excited states of such metal complexes by means of pulsed-laser time-resolved spectroscopy.

Synthetic Organic Chemistry Group

Prof.

Yoshiya Ikawa

Elucidation of the molecular bases of RNA molecules acting as enzymes and receptors. Artificial generation of novel structures and functions of RNA molecules and their applications.

Prof.

Naoto Hayashi

Dr. Hayashi's research focuses on the synthesis and elucidation of structure-property relationships of intelligent molecules bearing phenols and porphyrins and intelligent supramolecular compounds consisting of quinhydrone. He is studying these molecules/supramolecules not only in solutions, but also in a solid state. He is also involved in heterocyclic chemistry and high-pressure organic synthesis.

Assoc. Prof.

Masahiro Miyazawa

Dr. Miyazawa's research concentrates on stereo-selective synthesis using organotransition metal catalysts. He is currently developing a stereo-selective cyclization using a Pd(II) catalyst via hemiacetal intermediates. Dr. Miyazawa is also interested in stereo-selective synthesis of complex natural products. Targets include polyketides, terpenoids, carbohydrates, nucleosides and alkaloids.

Lect.

Hajime Yokoyama

Dr. Yokoyama focuses his research on novel stereo-selective methods, reactions and sequences towards the total synthesis of bio-active natural products.

Lect.

Shigeyoshi Matsumura

Development of microfluidic technologies to manipulate water-in-oil emulsion droplets and experimental evolution of RNA in the droplets as cell-like compartments.

Asst. Prof.

Junro Yoshino

Dr. Yoshino's research focuses on the syntheses, structures and properties of functional molecules that utilize characteristics of various elements.

Visiting Professors

Visiting Prof.

Yoshiro Hirai

1) Synthesizing biologically active natural products
2) Developing asymmetric reactions

Department of Biology

Structural Biology Group

Prof.

Yoshikane Iwatsubo

Dr. Iwatsubo focuses on both cytotaxonomic and cytogenetic studies of Japanese vascular plants, in particular, angiosperms. He records the appearance of chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis. The results are used to make detailed comparisons of related species and interpret their significance in classification and chromosome evolution of relatives.

Assoc. Prof.

Yuji Yamazaki

Dr. Yamazaki conducts research in order to elucidate fluctuating mechanisms of biodiversity. His major research is in the field of conservation genetics for aquatic animals, such as freshwater fishes and lampreys. Additionally, he has surveyed the process and pattern of phylogenetic evolution for Eastern Eurasia lampreys based on molecular techniques, ecological studies and field expeditions.

Assoc. Prof.

Kiyoto Maekawa

Dr. Maekawa's research program is an investigation into the factors important in the evolution and maintenance of insect societies, especially hemimetabolous social insects. He is also working on phylogenetic, population genetic, biogeographic, developmental genetic and morphometric characteristics of wood-feeding and social insects.

Assoc. Prof.

Tsutomu Tsuchida

1) Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of novel functions for environmental adaptation
2) Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying insect-microbe symbiosis
3) Development of novel methods to control pest insects by selective inhibition of the molecular function in symbiotic organ
For details, please visit our website at http://www3.u-toyama.ac.jp/symbiont/

Regulatory Biology Group

Prof.

Tatsuya Wakasugi

Dr. Wakasugi carries out research on the genes for chloroplast biogenesis and organ differentiation. He has determined and analyzed the structure of chloroplast genomes from several plants. He has studied post-transcriptional regulations, such as tRNA processing and RNA editing in chloroplasts. Recently, he has started trying to isolate the genes for haustorium development in holoparasitic plants - Cuscuta.

Prof.

Kouhei Matsuda

Dr. Matsuda carries out research on neuronal and hormonal regulation by peptides in lower vertebrates. Recent research involves studying regulatory peptides implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis, such as ghrelin, orexin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide and corticotrophin-releasing hormones in fishes. His research also focuses on peptide pheromones in urodele amphibians. His group discovered the peptide pheromone "sodefrin" in a newt.

Prof.

Ichiro Karahara

Dr. Karahara researches the regulation of plant tissue and cell differentiation by environment. He is currently studying regulation in development of the Casparian strip by environment, regulation of secondary wall formation by gravity environment, and vesicle transport analyzed by electron tomography.

Prof.

Masayuki Ikeda

Dr. Ikeda concentrates on the neuronal mechanisms underlying the biological clock that regulates daily sleeping/waking cycles. Using neuronal cell cultures and transgenic techniques with various Ca2+-sensing proteins based on a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory, he proves that circadian rhythms at the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations drive the clock movement of mice and fruit flies.

Assoc. Prof.

Shigeru Kikukawa

Dr. Kikukawa primarily studies photoperiodic time measurement for diapause determination. The model insect is the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella Hubner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) that may enter diapause in the last larval instar in response to the photoperiod during the preceding instars. An hourglass-type photoperiodic clock can be used to measure night length for this purpose in this species.

Lect.

Masayuki Yamamoto

Dr. Yamamoto focuses his research on the regulatory mechanisms of plant gene expression. He is studying the transcriptional activators responsible for the regulation of seed expression genes (seed storage protein genes and genes required for seed oil accumulation). Recently, Dr. Yamamoto has started trying to isolate genes associated with important agronomic traits of the sesame.

Lect.

Norifumi Konno

Dr. Konno carries out research on the endocrine regulatory mechanism related to an adaptation to various environments and social behaviors in fish (medaka, Siamese fighting fish, and lungfish) and amphibians. He also explores the novel functions of hormone by analyzing the distribution of target hormone receptor in vivo and physiological actions.

Lect.

Tomoya Nakamachi

Special field of Dr. Nakamachi’s study is neuroendocrinology. He focused on neuropeptide which is a bioactive peptide expressing in nervous tissues, and its physiological role on homeostasis and the regulation of behavior. He used rodent and fish, especially in mouse and zebrafish to reveal the neuropeptides functions using RNA interference and gene modification technique, and so on.

Asst. Prof.

Eri Morioka

Dr. Morioka focuses on elucidating the physiological activity rhythms in Drosophila with the goal of understanding how the molecular oscillations of clock genes generate physiological rhythms in circadian oscillators. Recently, she has revealed the importance of neuronal inputs to peripheral circadian oscillators in pupal endocrine glands. Ongoing projects include neuronal physiological analysis in circadian pacemaker neurons using tissue culturing, bio-imaging and electrophysiological techniques.

Asst. Prof.

Daisuke Tamaoki

Dr. Tamaoki is concerned with the effect of space environment on the life cycle of plants. In particular, his research focuses on the regulation of secondary cell wall formation in plants under altered gravity acceleration. He also studies the formation and maintenance mechanism of a bipolar spindle in plant cell using a live-imaging technique.

Department of Earth Sciences

Geosphere Physics Group

Prof.

Tomonori Matsuura

Dr. Matsuura is interested in two major research studies. The goal of first work is to improve analyses and forecasts of environmental and hazardous conditions over the oceans and in coastal zone. He also studies the ocean nonlinear phenomena from the framework of geophysical fluid dynamics, which are related to long-term climate variations.

Assoc. Prof.

Wataru Shimada

Dr. Shimada's interests include the mechanism of crystal growth, especially ice dendrite from supercooled water. Additionally, atomic mechanism of crystal growth, Si on Si(111) 7x7 reconstruction, and crystal growth of clathrate hydrate.

Assoc. Prof.

Kazuo Kawasaki

Dr. Kawasaki is interested in: a) paleomagnetic and rock magnetic applications to the hydrothermal deposits; b) paleomagnetic application to tectonics of accretionary orogen and mountain belt; and, c) magnetic monitoring of pollution.

Geodynamics Group

Prof.

Tohru Watanabe

Dr. Watanabe has been studying physical properties of rocks and mineals. He investigates elastic and electrical properties of serpentinites in order to clarify the distribution of serpentinites in subduction zones by geophysical observations. He also investigates gas permeability of volcanic rocks in order to understand degassing processes from magmas. Since 1998, he has been conducting collaborative research with HPT (High Pressure and Temperature) Laboratory in Utrecht University, the Netherland. They are studying the influence of water on rheological properties of rocksalts. He has investigated the distribution of water in rocksalts by electrical impedance measurements.

Prof.

Kazuaki Yasunaga

The research of Dr. Yasunaga focuses cumulus convection in the tropics, and local weather and climate around the Sea of Japan.
Examples include cloud organization associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and equatorial waves, cloud-ocean-coupling in the tropics, vertical tracer transport by cumulus convection, and air-land-sea interactions along the Sea of Japan coast.

Prof.

Kazuma Aoki

Dr. Aoki's research interests are focused in three major areas: i.e., Climate effect of Aerosol and Clouds, Aerosol and cloud optical properties, and remote sensing of earth environment. His researches may help better understand the aerosol optical characteristics measured by SKYNET sky radiometers in Global region.

Prof.

Shigekazu Kusumoto

Estimation of subsurface structures by means of gravity survey or electrical resistivity survey, and studies on these observation techniques. In addition, I am interesting in geological structures caused by activities of volcanoes and faults, and am trying to discuss their forming processes by analogue experiments or numerical simulations including analytical studies.

Geological Science Group

Prof.

Masaaki Shimizu

Dr. Shimizu is interested in the genetic studies of mineral assemblages based on each of mineral descriptive and field studies, especially in ore deposits and granitoid bodies. Throughout such processes, Dr. Shimizu described eight new minerals (watanabeite, tsugaruite, pararsenolamprite, keilite, magnesiofoitite, marumoite, Tokyoite, iwashiroite) and many ore minerals sited in Strunz Mineralogical Tables by Strunz and Nickel (2001). Dr. Shimizu is a national representative of IMA-COM (International Mineralogical Association-Committee of Ore Mineralogy) and were a vice president in Asia of SGA (Society for Geology Applied to Mineral Deposits) in 1998-2003.

Prof.

Shigeru Otoh

Dr. Otoh is interested in the evolution of the three-dimensional geologic structure and surface environment of the Eurasian continent. He particularly makes much of map-scale geologic structures that reflect ancient plate movements. His recent studies involve the evolution of shear zones and large-scale fault-related folds in the Japanese Islands, and the characterization of accretionary complexes in the Central Asian orogenic belt.

Prof.

Yasuo Ishizaki

Dr. Ishizaki's research centers on the behavior of magma in and on the Earth's crust as deduced from field relationships and the chemical analysis of volcanic rocks and silicate/oxide minerals. The broad goal is to further understanding of the evolution of magmas in crustal magma chambers, their behavior during volcanic eruptions, and their implications for magmatic and volcanic processes.

Assoc. Prof.

Kenji Kashiwagi

Dr. Kashiwagi has studied the Jurassic-Cretaceous radiolarian assemblages from the shallow marine sediments for reconstructing the paleobiogeography on East Asia during the Mesozoic Era. Also he has focused cave use of Japanese macaque (primates) through cave studies in heavy snow areas.

Cooperating Laboratory (Center for Far Eastern Studies)

Prof.

Konosuke Sugiura

Dr. Sugiura is interested in cryosphere variation and interaction between snow cover and vegetation/soil/atmosphere on a global scale (in particular North East Asia) by means of field observation, remote sensing, data analysis, numerical model and large cold room experiment.

Visiting Professors

Visiting Prof.

Hideo Sakai

Dr. Sakai's research interests are focused in two major areas. The first involves rockmagnetic research applying on the paleomagnetism, archaeomagnetism and biomagnetism. Another focus is magneto-electrical prospecting at the fields of archaeology and glaciology.

Department of Environmental Biology and Chemistry

Environmental and Analytical Chemistry Group

Prof.

Jing Zhang

Professor Zhang's research goal is to clarify the origins and circulation mechanisms of materials in the land and seas of the earth, and linking these with global environmental changes using trace elements and isotopes. Her specific research topics include: 1) geochemistry of submarine groundwater discharge and its impact on coastal environments, 2) oceanic circulation and variation related to global climate change, 3) the origins and long-term transposition of anthropogenic material and its impact on the marine ecosystem, and 4) monitoring formation mechanisms of chemical synthesis communities in cold seep areas.

Prof.

Hideki Kuramitz

Dr. Kuramitz is concerned with the development of bioanalytical assay and biosensor using electrochemical techniques. In particular, he has designed labeled ligands with electrochemical active compounds for binding affinity assay with dynamic monitoring. He has also achieved a number of water treatment methods for organic pollutants based on electrochemical decomposition and anodic polymerization. Furthermore, he is currently studying the interaction between organic pollutants and humic substances, which is one of the most ubiquitous natural organic compounds present in water environments.

Prof.

Katsumi Marumo

Dr. Marumo is a geochemist with particular interests in the geochemical cycles of toxic heavy metals such as arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead in earth surface environments. He is currently focusing on developing a non-destructive chemical analytical method for these toxic heavy metals in soils, sediments, rocks, and plants, using X-ray fluorescence spectrometers, as a cooperative research with a private company and the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. He is also studying the isotope geochemistry of mercury in seafloor hydrothermal environments as a cooperative research with the National Institute for Environmental Studies. Following the serious nuclear accident at Fukushima in 2011, Dr. Marumo started a cooperative research with a private company to develop a safe method for the underground disposal of radioactive cesium.

Assoc. Prof.

Noriko Hata

Dr. Hata concentrates her research on the behavior of trace contaminants in water environments such as rivers, estuaries, coasts, dam reservoirs and springs. For that purpose, she has developed simple, versatile and sensitive methods for preconcentrating and determining trace analytes, such as arsenic, ammonia, nitrite, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and cadmium in environmental waters. She proposes high enrichment/determination systems with micro-organic ion-associate phase extraction via in situ fresh phase formation.

Assoc. Prof.

Keiji Horikawa

Dr. Horikawa is a geochemist with a particular interest in paloclimate, paleoceanography, and environmental science. His current focus is to understand interaction among ocean, land, and climate, which has controlled the earth's climate for the past 4.6 billion years. He also has an ongoing interest in (1) reconstructing high-resolution climate records for the past several millennia from peat and lacustrine sediments and (2) applying rare earth elements and their isotopes to understand a hydrologic cycle and to identify recharge areas of underground water in Toyama prefecture.

Asst. Prof.

Kazuto Sazawa

Dr. Sazawa is concerned with the function and behavior of natural organic matter in the soil and water environment. In particular, he is currently focusing on the effect of forest fire and climate change on the soil organic matter, which is one of the largest carbon reservoirs on the Earth’s surface. He is also interested in the image analysis and color measurement of soil, vegetation and snow to evaluate the impact of environmental change.

Asst. Prof.

Tamihisa Ohta

Dr. Ohta has focused on effects of forest vegetation type on stream and soil invertebrates through alteration of nutrients dynamics. Recently, he has also studied about environmental assessment using moss as a bioindicator.

Physiology and Ecology Group

Prof.

Yasushi Yokohata

Dr. Yokohata is primarily concerned with the ecology and evolution of moles (Soricomorpha: Talpidae) and various other mammals. He is also interested in parasitic helminth communities in the moles and other wild mammalian and avian hosts. Recently, he has conducted various activities for wildlife conservation involving the mammals, parasites and other wild organisms.

Prof.

Daisuke Tanaka

Dr. Tanaka's interests include microbial ecology in atmospheric and aquatic environments by using biochemical and molecular biological methods. Another research interest is to isolate and characterize new microorganisms capable of degrading heavy oil, lubricating oil, or edible oil for bioremediation.

Prof.

Hiroshi Ishii

Dr. Ishii's research involves ecology, evolution and conservation of plant-animal interactions. In particular, his research focuses on pollination ecology and behavior of flower visiting animals. Some of his projects include: explaining the remarkable diversity of floral character; clarifying the relationship between cognitive ability of insects and their behavior; estimating the ecological impact of the invading species on plant-pollinator interactions.

Assoc. Prof.

Hiroyuki Kamachi

Dr. Kamachi's research concentrates on the mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance and accumulation in metal hyperaccumulators, who can accumulate exceptionally large amounts of heavy metals in plant bodies. The fern Athyrium yokoscense, which accumulates Cd, Cu and Pb, has been used by Dr. Kamachi for investigating plant material. He is also interested in plant photomorphogenesis in gametophytes of the fern Ceratopteris richardii (C-fern).

Lect.

Akihiro Sakatoku

Dr. Sakatoku's reseach focuses on bioremediation and biomass using microorganisms, such as bacteria, yeast and fungi. His recent investigations have involved the isolation and characterization of seaweed-degrading or polysaccharide-degrading bacteria using biochemical and molecular biological methods. He is also interested in biomonitoring on sea water ollution using bivalves.

Concurrent Department of Earth Science

Prof.

Kazuma Aoki

Dr. Aoki's research interests are focused in three major areas: i.e., Climate effect of Aerosol and Clouds, Aerosol and cloud optical properties, and remote sensing of earth environment. His researches may help better understand the aerosol optical characteristics measured by SKYNET sky radiometers in Global region.

Assoc. Prof.

Kenji Kashiwagi

Dr. Kashiwagi has studied the Jurassic-Cretaceous radiolarian assemblages from the shallow marine sediments for reconstructing the paleobiogeography on East Asia during the Mesozoic Era. Also he has focused cave use of Japanese macaque (primates) through cave studies in heavy snow areas.

Assoc. Prof.

Wataru Shimada

Dr. Shimada's interests include the mechanism of crystal growth, especially ice dendrite from supercooled water. Additionally, atomic mechanism of crystal growth, Si on Si(111) 7x7 reconstruction, and crystal growth of clathrate hydrate.

Cooperating Laboratory (Center for Far Eastern Studies)

Prof.

Naoya Wada

Dr. Wada takes an interest in the growth and reproduction of arctic and alpine plants under the conditions of global climate change. He has recently performed a joint study on allozyme variation and genetic diversity in a circumpolar plant (Dryas octopetala var. asiatica) growing fragmentally in mid-latitude mountainous areas of northeast Asia.

Visiting Professors

Visiting Prof.

Shigeru Taguchi

Dr. Taguchi researches separation chemistry through solid-phase extraction for environmental trace analysis and the treatment of waste water polluted with organic substances using a UV irradiation technique. He is also interested in investigating the fate of pollutants contained in domestic waste water that enter environmental waters using analytical speciation techniques.

Visiting Prof.

Shogo Nakamura

Dr. Nakamura's areas of interest include bioassay and bioremediation using microorganisms, such as green algae, bacteria, and fungi. His recent investigations have involved the isolation and characterization of cellulose-degrading or food oil-degrading bacteria for sludge digestion. He is also studying stress proteins in mussels in order to keep an eye on sea water pollution levels.