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Meet some of our students

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Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Education, Ph.D. Program
R.E.T(Cameroon)

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Typical daily schedule
6:00-6:30
Wake up
7:00-8:00
Arrival at the lab
7:00or8:00-13:00
Lab analysis and deskwork
13:00-13:30
Lunch
13:45-20:00
Lab analysis and deskwork
21:00-23:00
Contact and chat with family
23:00or24:00
Bed time
My dream

I always long to see any sign of improvement in any aspect of life in my country. Lucky enough, at this stage of my life, I have got some experiences in several domains including education, cultural diversity, and management that I could share with others. After completion of my PhD, I would like to use the rich academic and managerial skills from diverse cultures to contribute to the development in research and education in my country and the international community as a whole. My ultimate goal is to support educational programs for the underprivileged.

My reason for choosing the University of Toyama

I was selected to benefit from a JICA scholarship in the framework of the disaster mitigation project on two CO2 rich lakes in Cameroon, sponsored by the Cameroon and Japan governments. This project involves scientific collaborations of researchers from both countries. The choice of Toyama University was primarily because my supervisors were faculty staff of Toyama University and also members of the Satreps project under which my PhD is funded. It would have been very difficult for me to make a choice prior to the selection processes since I did not know much about Japan. However, after the choice was proposed, I got additional information about the University of Toyama from the internet. I found that the University has standard laboratories in my research field.
During my study, I discovered that Toyama University was a good choice because, I found here a University with an ‘’open-door’’ policy that provides a conducive environment for studies and fosters collaborative reflection. Furthermore, I had frequent scientific exchanges with professors, researchers, and other students. In addition, the laboratories are well-equipped, and the University staff and community are very friendly. Finally, Toyama is a quiet city, with friendly people and lots of facilities to make one’s life enjoyable.

My thoughts for prospective students

Most common concerns for people who are coming to Japan for the first time are about the language, extreme climate (winter and summer) and natural disasters (earthquakes and tsunamis).
The Japanese language constitutes a barrier for many foreigners as it is very different from several languages. It is very necessary to understand the basics of the language for normal daily interaction with the community. The University of Toyama provides intensive Japanese classes for foreign students that I recommend all prospective students to take it serious. I attended the classes for six months and found it so good, important and necessary, else my experience would have been limited.
Regarding climate and natural disasters, it is very important always to get updates from the Japan meteorological centers for any eventual hazard. It is equally good to know the emergency gathering or evacuation centers in their area of residence. There is no need to panic during an eventual alert. Rather, it is good to follow the disaster management rules and guides.

Income and Living Costs
(Interviewed in Mar. 2015)

Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Education, Ph.D. Program
R.A (Indonesia)

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Typical daily schedule
5:30-6:30
Wake up and pray
6:30-8:00
Eat breakfast
8:00-9:00
Go to the university
9:00-12:00
Study and work on research
12:00-13:00
Eat lunch
13:00-19:00
Study and work on research
19:00-19:30
Return home
19:30-20:00
Eat dinner
20:00-23:00
Relax and go to bed
My dream

I want to be a researcher and teacher with the knowledge and skills to produce high-quality students.

My reason for choosing the University of Toyama

I chose the University of Toyama for my studies because it has excellent facilities, including buildings, library, hospital, and research instrumentation, especially, the geochemistry laboratory. In addition, the environment around the university is relatively spacious and uncrowded, which provides a very good atmosphere to study.

My thoughts for prospective students

Japan is known for its particularly advanced technology. Although the recent disastrous earthquake has severely affected the Japanese economy, it has had very little effect on my studies. In fact, in my experience, Japan is still a good place to study. The University of Toyama is located in an area that is not historically prone to earthquakes; thus, it should remain a safe place to study. I have found the environment, facilities, and surrounding community to be very supportive.

Income and Living Costs
(Interviewed in Mar. 2011)

Alumnus of the Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Education
N.J (South Korea)

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Typical daily schedule
7:30-9:00
Wake up and eat breakfast
9:00-12:00
Work on research
12:00-13:00
Eat lunch
13:00-20:00
Work on research
20:00-24:00
Eat dinner, relax, and go to bed
My dream

I hope to grow as a man not only superficially but also have a truly deep good character. I hope to grow completely as a human being not just to pursue a good job or physical things.

My reason for choosing the University of Toyama

Toyama has a beautiful campus and is an excellent place to study biology. The food and water are good, and the study environment is excellent. I enjoyed my six years of student life in Toyama; it was quite different from what I would have experienced in Tokyo or Osaka.

My thoughts for prospective students

Many people are undecided about studying in Japan after the massive earthquake. Here however, we have many opportunities. It is not easy to study abroad at a young age. However, overcoming such difficulties helps us grow up and develop courage, self-confidence, and knowledge as well as broadens our horizons. I recommend that you try it.

Income and Living Costs
(Interviewed in Mar. 2011)

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